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Tag: Movement Strategy

Winning: Rights and Respect

In reproductive justice circles, the victory of the Respect ABQ Women campaign received a flurry of attention in the fall of 2013  when Albuquerque voters defeated a ban on late-term abortions. The Building Movement Project  went back to talk to five leaders in that Campaign to understand why they...more

The Respect ABQ Women Campaign

The Respect ABQ Women campaign sent shock waves through the reproductive rights community with its resounding defeat of a ballot initiative banning late-term abortion in Albuquerque. When anti-abortion groups filed their petitions in early July 2013, polls indicated that the ban would easily pass. Yet by the vote in November, a...more

Understanding “Hong Kong People!”

Growing up, my dad often introduced himself as being “Hong Kong people.” The first thing he wanted you to know was his name; the second thing was that he was from Hong Kong. Being from Hong Kong was an enormous source of pride for him, and he frequently...more

For Full Inclusion and Equality, Must Look Beyond Marriage

As the Supreme Court prepares to submit rulings on the two same-sex marriage cases awaiting decision right now, Sean Thomas-Bretifeld discusses the implications of these decisions and what they will mean for the LGBT movement moving forward.  A strike down of DOMA and California's Proposition 8 will mean a big win in the recent string of marriage equality victories. Yet Sean, citing the findings of our new report, argues that the legal changes represented in these marriage equality wins aren't enough to solve greater injustices or prevent other kinds of further discrimination, like housing and employment.  Instead, he argues that a movement based on a broader coalition that is focused on a more comprehensive social justice platform will do more to bring the LGBT community closer to full inclusion. 

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At the Crossroads

At the Crossroads explores how local, state, and national policy advocates and organizers see the future of the LGBT movement. The findings point to LGBT leaders’ desire to define movement making beyond the marriage moment. The respondents in our study, many of whom work  on marriage equality, are aware of the long road ahead, and there is a deep concern that the LGBT movement is not prepared to address a host of issues that prevent LGBT people from obtaining full equity and fairness.

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